Arsal, Lebanon: Emergency Response Update

 

 

 
 

August 7, 2014 - Following deadly violence between armed forces and insurgents in the Lebanese border town of Arsal over the weekend, International Medical Corps is preparing to mobilize local staff and prepositioned stockpiles of medicines and supplies as soon as access permits.  With many vulnerable people needing immediate medical care and critical resources, Arsal currently remains inaccessible to humanitarian groups.  What’s more, the number of medical staff, equipment and medicine within its borders are limited and water supply remains precarious.

Situated on the border with Syria, Arsal is home to approximately 42,000 Syrians seeking shelter and safety from the ongoing war.  A number of fires resulting from shelling have erupted in sites sheltering refugees.  More than 1,300 affected people are reported to have fled Arsal’s borders for various parts of the Bekaa valley.

Having operated in Lebanon for nearly a decade, International Medical Corps’ team is monitoring the unfolding situation and is well-placed to provide a comprehensive humanitarian response as needed.  In addition to vital medicines and supplies, we are working with our local partners to mobilize mobile medical units to respond to the increasing health needs of affected families.

Since its inception 30 years ago, International Medical Corps' mission has been consistent: relieve the suffering of those impacted by war, natural disaster and disease, by delivering vital health care services that focus on training. This approach of helping people help themselves is critical to returning devastated populations to self-reliance. For more information visit: www.InternationalMedicalCorps.org. Also see us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

 

FROM RELIEF TO SELF-RELIANCE

For 30 years, International Medical Corps has worked to relieve the suffering of those impacted by war, natural disaster and disease by delivering vital health care services that focus on training, helping devastated populations return to self-reliance.

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