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A Look Back: Two Years Since the Russian Invasion of Ukraine

Since Russia invaded Ukraine in February 2022, International Medical Corps has expanded our work throughout the country. Here’s a look at how we’ve helped.

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War in Ukraine: Two-Year Update

As Ukrainians continue their fight for independence, we continue to ensure access to health services and training for millions of civilians affected by the war.
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A Look Back: Two Years Since the Russian Invasion of Ukraine

International Medical Corps’ history in Ukraine dates back to 1999, but we’ve working consistently in the country since 2014, when conflict broke out in the southeast. Based in Mariupol, our team provided outpatient primary healthcare, mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS), gender-based violence (GBV) prevention and treatment services, and immunization support. When Russia invaded Ukraine …

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What’s Next in 2024

International Medical Corps experts review the challenges and achievements of our global humanitarian work in 2023 and discuss what’s on the horizon for 2024.
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Serving on the Front Lines of Disaster Medicine

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina ripped through large areas of the American South, decimating homes, businesses and hospitals, and leaving thousands of people across Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi in despair. Native Mississippian John Roberts, in college at the time, volunteered to help local communities recover. What he saw there inspired him to become an emergency- and …

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March Snapshots 2023

Prioritizing Staff Well-Being Providing humanitarian assistance in disaster and crisis situations can take a toll on the physical and mental health of frontline first responders. Because many of our staff are local to the communities they serve, they often can be directly affected by a crisis at the same time they’re working to provide lifesaving …

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February Snapshots 2023

Responding to Earthquakes in Turkey and Syria People in earthquake-affected areas of Turkey and Syria are at heightened risk of contracting infectious diseases and waterborne illnesses due to poor shelter conditions and overcrowding at facilities for displaced people, and disruptions and damage to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) systems. With needs remaining high, our teams …

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